Understanding Insulation and R-Value

Insulation is typically something you only think about when you’re either putting it into a home or tearing it out. Did you know that you can add to the R-value of your insulation,
without starting over?

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R-value is the resistance of heat transfer through the insulation, so the higher the R-value, the less heat is lost. The more heat you can keep in during the winter, and the more heat you can keep out in the summer, the lower your utility bills should be.

When you’re looking to add insulation, the best place to start is your attic. This is where you get the most bang for your buck. If you were to upgrade your insulation from three inches to twelve inches, you could save 20% in the winter and 10% in the summer months on your heating and air bills.

To measure your existing R-value, all you’ll need is a tape measure, a pen and something to write on. Place the tape measure down and touch the ceiling board to get the height. For fiberglass and cellulose insulation, once you have that number in inches, multiply it by 3.5 to get your R-value.

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Depending on where you live, your recommended R-value  will differ. If it’s a colder climate, you’ll want to have a higher R-value for your home. To find out what your R-value should be, visit http://hes.lbl.gov/consumer/.

For more information on R-value and other technical information, visit the U.S.
Department of Energy’s website at https://energy.gov/energysaver/insulation.

At Meek’s, we both sell and install Johns Manville Batt, Blow-In, and Blow-In Blanket insulation. Whether you’re looking to do it yourself or have it done for you, we’re here to help! Just ask your local store for more info.

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